Monday, December 26, 2016

Leg compressions improve ventilatory efficiency while reducing peak and post exercise blood lactate, but does not improve perceived exertion, exercise economy or aerobic exercise capacity in endurance-trained runners.

Leg compressions improve ventilatory efficiency while reducing peak and post exercise blood lactate, but does not improve perceived exertion, exercise economy or aerobic exercise capacity in endurance-trained runners.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2016 Dec 21;:

Authors: Rivas E, Smith JD, Sherman NW


PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine if leg compressions would alter cardiorespiratory and perceived exertion measures during rest, submaximal and maximal exercise in endurance-trained runners.
METHOD: Thirteen young, endurance trained runners (10 males, 20.9 ±3y, 58.9 ±5.7 ml·kg·min(-1)) completed a randomized design, leg compressions and non-compression control condition. The incremental graded exercise test consisted of baseline rest and submaximal intensities at 23%, 70%, 75%, 85% and then a progressive increase to 100% VO2max. Running economy (RE), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), breathing rate (BR), heart rate (HR), ventilation (VE), blood lactate, VO2max and ventilatory efficiency (VE/VO2) were the primary outcome variables.
RESULTS: Relative to the control condition, VO2 at rest, during submaximal and at max were not different. Additionally, RE, RPE, BR, and HR were similar under both conditions. Leg compressions reduced lactate at VO2max by 11% (P<0.05) and at 10min post-exercise recovery by 18% (P<0.01). Additionally, peak VE was significantly increased in the compression condition by 8% (P<0.0001) relative to the control condition. Ventilatory efficiency was improved in compressions compared to control condition at 85 and 100% VO2max (condition x time interaction, P<0.0001).
CONCLUSION: These data suggest that leg compressions do not alter RE, RPE, BR, HR, or VO2, during exercise. However, compressions may be beneficial for submaximal and maximal ventilatory efficiency while improving lactate clearance at VO2max and during recovery in trained runners.

28013058

Read More