Sunday, November 20, 2016

Long-term effects of high-intensity interval training in heart transplant recipients; a 5-year follow-up study of a randomized controlled trial.

Long-term effects of high-intensity interval training in heart transplant recipients; a 5-year follow-up study of a randomized controlled trial.

Clin Transplant. 2016 Nov 12;:

Authors: Yardley M, Gullestad L, Bendz B, Bjørkelund E, Rolid K, Arora S, Nytrøen K


BACKGROUND: Previously studies have demonstrated that high-intensity interval training(HIT) is superior to moderate-continuous exercise in general and in cardiovascular diseases. Recently we also found HIT safe and efficient after heart transplantation(HTx). This study reports the 5-year long-term effects.
DESIGN AND METHODS: Forty-one HTx-patients who had completed the previous 12-month randomized controlled trial, comparing HIT-intervention with usual care, were eligible. In particular we measured VO2peak , muscular capacity, intravascular ultrasound and questionnaires measuring physical and mental health.
RESULTS: The baseline mean±SD values were: Age; 49.1±16.5 years, men; 68%, time since HTx: 4.1±2.2 years. Within the HIT-group, initial VO2peak increased significantly from 27.7±5.7 to 31.2±5.3 mL/kg/min. However, during the next 4 years VO2peak decreased to 26.0±6.2 mL/kg/min. The control group showed slightly decreasing VO2peak values during the entire 5 year period. The HIT-group reported significantly less anxiety-symptoms, but there were no long-term differences in VO2peak , muscular capacity or cardiac allograft vasculopathy between the groups. The similar VO2peak values correspond to our findings of similar everyday activity.
CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that intermittent periods of HIT may be necessary to maintain the initial benefits gained from the intervention. However, HIT probably reduce the burden of anxiety, which is a frequent health issue following HTx. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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