Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Influence of a high-intensity interval training session on peripheral and central blood pressure at rest and during stress testing in healthy individuals.

Influence of a high-intensity interval training session on peripheral and central blood pressure at rest and during stress testing in healthy individuals.

Vasa. 2016 Sep;45(5):373-7

Authors: Ketelhut S, Milatz F, Heise W, Ketelhut RG


BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity is known to reduce arterial pressure (BP). In a previous investigation, we could prove that even a single bout of moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) causes a prolonged reduction in BP. Whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has a favourable influence on BP, and therefore may be followed subjects and methods by a prolonged BP reduction, should be examined on the basis of blood pressure response after exercise and during a subsequent stress test.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 39 healthy men (aged 34 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2), peripheral and central BP were measured noninvasively at rest and at the end of a 2-min cold pressor test (CPT) using a Mobil-O-Graph (24 PWA monitor, IEM). Following HIIT (6 x 1 min at 98% of the previously determined maximum wattage, 4-min rest between intervals) BP was measured again throughout 60 min of rest and thereafter during a CPT. The results were compared with those obtained before HIIT.
RESULTS: Similar to MICE, peripheral and central BPs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower 45 min after HIIT. When analysing peripheral BP during a CPT before and after exercise, significantly lower systolic (p < 0.001) and diastolic (p = 0.008) pressures were established after HIIT. This was true for systolic (p = 0.002) and diastolic (p = 0.006) central BP as well. Although there were no more significant differences between pressures at rest before and 60 min after exercise, the increase in peripheral systolic pressure due to CPT was significantly slower after HIIT (p = 0.019) when compared with BP during CPT before exercise. This was true for central systolic BP as well (p = 0.017).
CONCLUSION: HIIT leads to a BP reduction, which can still be detected up to 45 min after completion of the training. Even 60 min after exercise, pressures during a CPT showed a reduced augmentation, indicating an attenuated hemodynamic response to stress testing after HIIT.

27594392

Read More