Saturday, September 17, 2016

Detraining-induced alterations in adipokines and cardiometabolic risk factors after nonlinear periodized resistance and aerobic interval training in obese men.

Detraining-induced alterations in adipokines and cardiometabolic risk factors after nonlinear periodized resistance and aerobic interval training in obese men.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 May 27;:1-8

Authors: Nikseresht M, Hafezi Ahmadi MR, Hedayati M


This study compared the effects of nonlinear resistance training (NRT), aerobic interval training (AIT), and detraining on adipokines and cardiometabolic risk factors in middle-aged obese men. Thirty-three obese men were randomly allocated to NRT (n = 12), AIT (n = 10), and control (CON, n = 11) groups. Subjects in experimental groups performed exercise protocols 3 days per week for 12 weeks followed by a 4-week detraining period. The NRT involved 55 min of weight training with flexible periodization. The AIT consisted of running on a treadmill (4 × 4-min intervals at 90% of maximal heart rate, with each interval separated by 3 min at 65%). Peak oxygen consumption increased significantly after training compared with CON (P < 0.01), but it increased more in the AIT group than in the NRT group (P = 0.004). After detraining, peak oxygen consumption decreased significantly in both training groups (P < 0.001); however, the value in the AIT group was still higher than that in the CON group (P = 0.003). No significant changes were observed in serum levels of omentin-1 and interleukin (IL)-18 after training (P > 0.05), but omentin-1 decreased significantly in both training groups and IL-18 increased significantly in the NRT group after detraining (P < 0.05). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased significantly after training in the AIT group compared with the CON group (P < 0.05) and returned to the pre-training level after detraining. Conversely, apelin-13 increased significantly in response to training, compared with baseline (P < 0.05), and remained unchanged after detraining. Both training regimens had similar effects on most markers; however, AIT seems to have stronger anti-coronary disease effects (as indicated by HDL-C and peak oxygen consumption) than NRT.

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